Top 3 Biggest Tournament Meltdowns in PGA History

Golf can be an extremely difficult sport in that the same player can have two vastly different performances on the same course. Things like wind, rain, and many more factors play a much bigger role in golf than it does in other sports. In a similar vein, sometimes a player can just straight up have a bad game, but sometimes those bad games can destroy a huge lead and that is exactly what we will be looking at here today.

1. Adam Scott at the 2012 British Open

(source: news.com.au)

(source: news.com.au)

Now you have to feel extremely bad for Scott here. After being up four shots with only four holes to play, Scott had to be thinking he was about to win one of the biggest golf tournaments on the planet. However, Scott would bogey each and every one of the final four holes in perfect conditions. Who knows what was up with Scott but something had to have been up for him to have such a bad final four holes after playing extremely good for almost each and every hole prior to the collapse.

2. Jordan Spieth at the 2016 Masters

(source: golfchannel.com)

(source: golfchannel.com)

This one just happened over the weekend so there is no doubting that Mr. Spieth is still feeling the effects of this loss. Making matters even worse, Spieth held a massive 5 stroke lead when he arrived at the 10th hole and was seemingly destined to become only the fourth player ever to win two straight Masters. Instead, numerous  bad shots led him to end up losing his lead and ultimately the green jacket as well. It will likely take quite a while to get over this one.

3. Jean Van De Velde at the 1999 British Open

(source: back9network.com)

(source: back9network.com)

There is absolutely zero confusion as to who had the biggest collapse in golf history. This guy was up three strokes heading into the FINAL hole of the tournament and was all but sure the title was his. Well, following a number of questionable shots and decisions, he ended up with a triple bogey seven and one of the most embarrassing tournament losses of all time. Even worse, the man he lost to was 10 strokes back of the leader to start the day.

 



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